Camping / Central Florida / Kayak & Canoe / Lodging / Parks & Forests / Springs

Silver Springs State Park: Famous spring plus cabins, hiking, history

Clear turquoise water along Silver River. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Clear turquoise water along Silver River. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

The former Silver River State Park and the Silver Springs attraction are now one terrific state park

Silver Springs has been famous since the 1870s; it is Florida’s best-known spring.  And yet, its location in the center of the state in Ocala miles off the expressway means lots of Florida residents and visitors haven’t been here.

Some might hear Silver Springs and think “tacky tourist attraction.”

You couldn’t be more wrong.

Rhesus monkey at Silver Springs State Park in Ocala. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Rhesus monkey escaped from a jungle attraction decades ago and can be spotted in Silver Springs State Park in Ocala. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

In 2013, the state of Florida took over the famous spring attraction, merging it with a neighboring state park and preserving one of the most exquisite slices of Florida natural beauty anywhere.

A sunken boat is a haven for turtles along the Silver River. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

A sunken boat is a haven for turtles along the Silver River. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Silver Springs State Park now offers visitors a wide variety of activities and features:

  • The classic glass-bottom boat tour, which was Florida’s first, begun in 1878, continues.
  • Canoe and kayak rentals are now available at the Silver Springs headwater. These allow you to  enjoy pristine scenery and wildlife on what could be Florida’s most beautiful kayak trail.
  • Fifteen miles of lovely forest trails that can be walked or ridden on mountain bikes.
  • The best state-park cabins we’ve ever stayed in – for $110 a night, you get a fully equipped two-bedroom house with a huge screened porch, a gas fireplace, surrounded by a mature forest.
  • Beautiful tree-shaded sites for tents or RVs.
  • A museum and environmental education center set in a village of historic Cracker buildings that were moved here to tell the story of Florida’s pioneers.
  • Horseback riding on trails at the nearby Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway, part of the Florida State Parks.

In addition, Silver Springs State Park is a great base for exploring Ocala National Forest, particularly the opportunity to canoe on Juniper Spring, a half hour east, or the Ocklawaha,  a half hour north. Staying here, you also could visit Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Cross Creek, a highlight of any trip to this region.

Cabins and camping at Silver Springs State Park

silver-river-porch

The screen porch on the cabins at Silver Springs State Park is huge.

silver-river-fireplace

In winter, you can have fireplace-lit coziness with the flick of switch, turning on the gas fireplace at Silver Springs State Park.

silver-river-cabin-exterior

The cabins at Silver Springs State Park are actually well-equipped two bedroom Cracker-style houses.

We love cabins in Florida State Parks and we’ve stayed in many, but these are about the best we’ve experienced.

It starts with the setting. Each “cabin” – and these are really houses more than cabins – is situated in the woods surrounded only by big trees and vegetation, separated from neighboring cabins. Out back, there’s a fire ring for campfires and s’mores.  The metal roofs and big porches make these structures look like Florida Cracker houses.

The screened porches are massive. You could hold a sit-down luncheon for 40 in the porch if there were tables and chairs.  Instead, there is a big picnic table, a few rocking chairs and solitude.

Inside, there are two bedrooms, one with a double bed; one with twins. A sleeper sofa increases capacity to six. The bathroom is designed to work well with multiple guests. These accommodations would lend themselves to two families or three couples sharing.

The Silver River: Beautiful and endangered.

The Silver River at Silver Springs State Park.

There’s a full kitchen and dining room table for six, cozy wooden cabin-like décor and a gas fireplace that provides a warm glow with the flick of a switch.  At the ranger station, you can check out board and cards games, as there is no wifi, no phones and no TV.

The kitchen has a dishwasher and microwave. My only criticisms: Don’t plan to do real cooking. There are few serving dishes, no cutting board and few pans. And our cabins had the hardest bed I’ve ever found.

The campgrounds are similarly well-planned with each site large enough to separate it from its neighbors.  Here’s a picture of a typical site.

Cabins and campsites can be reserved up to 11 months in advance and you must reserve cabins for at least two nights on weekends and holidays. (And they book up for weekends way in advance.)

You reach the cabins, as well as the hiking trails and the Cracker village, via the former entrance to Silver River State Park, on County Road 35.

The history of Silver Springs and what it’s like today

silver springs 1880s

Silver Springs was one of Florida’s earliest attraction. This photo, courtesy of the Florida Memory Project, is from the 1880s.

silver springs palm 1940 postcard

This horseshoe palm pictured in this 1940s postcard of Silver Springs is still there!

The beauty of Silver Spring, one of the largest artesian springs in the world, has been appreciated for hundreds of years. The first glass-bottom boat tours started in 1878 – incredibly early by Florida standards.

In the 1930s, six of the original Tarzan movies, starring Johnny Weissmuller, were filmed on location at Silver Springs. In the late 50s and 60s, the clear water made this the perfect location to film more than a 100 episodes of “Sea Hunt,” starring Lloyd Bridges. “Creature from the Black Lagoon” was filmed here; so were scenes from movies ranging from “Rebel Without a Cause” to James Bond’s “Thunderball.”

From its earliest days, Silver Springs was a commercial attraction.  In the 1950s, 800,000 people visited a year, according to the Silver Springs Nature and Theme Park, the company that used to operate the attraction at the spring.

Today, the main entrance to the park is what used to be the entrance to the roadside attraction, and it still has that flavor.

The commercial area of restaurants and gift shops is still thriving. In addition, there is now an interesting exhibit about the history of Silver Springs and Paradise Park, an adjacent attraction developed for African Americans during the era of segregation.

There are paved walkways that allow you to stroll through the grounds and gardens and pavilions that have good viewpoints overlooking the spring.

It’s a place that is obviously popular with locals as it was bustling on a sunny Sunday afternoon. There were two weddings taking place in the park that evening.

The springhead itself is beautiful, so spend some time and gaze into its clear water.

In the glass-bottom boat tours or by kayak, you can spot the statues on the bottom of the spring that look historic. In reality, they were placed there for an episode of the 1960s TV series “I Spy,” starring Bill Cosby.

Silver Springs State Park by canoe, kayak or glass-bottom boat

Six turtles at Silver Springs River

Six turtles at Silver Springs River.

Silver Springs State Park makes it easy to kayak Silver Springs. You can rent canoes and kayaks at the spring. You also can take the short glass-bottom boat rides.

  • Glass-bottom boat trips operate from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The 30-45 minute tours are $11 for adults; $10 for seniors and youth.
  • Canoe or two-person kayak: $18 for the first hour, $9 for each additional hour, all day for $45. Single kayak: $14 for the first hour, $7 each additional hour, all day for $35. Details here.
  • You can rent canoes, kayaks or take a guided trip. You can also paddle the Silver River from a launch five miles downstream. Details are in the Silver Springs kayaking guide.

Trails for hiking, biking and horses at Silver Springs State Park

silver-river-lichen

Deer moss on a foggy morning created a fairyland setting at Silver Springs State Park.

Hikers and mountain bikers enjoy Silver Springs State Park, which has almost 15 miles of biking and hiking trails meandering through wetlands, swamps, oak hammocks and pine forests. We hiked many of the trails: They are quiet, well-maintained and gorgeous.

The trails at Silver Springs State Park go through some beautiful scenery. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

The trails at Silver Springs State Park go through some beautiful scenery. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Off-road biking is permitted on all 15 miles of trails. Trails, which are sand, are for fat-tire bikes only.

In a separate area of the park, shady, forest trails are reserved exclusively for riders on horseback. Guided trail rides are offered by Cactus Jack’s Trail Rides (352-266-9326).

Exhibits at Silver Springs State Park

Silver-River-Pioneer-Villag

A museum and environmental education center set in a village of historic Cracker buildings that were moved here to tell the story of Florida’s pioneers. Admission is $2 per person.

Whether you tour the museum or not, it’s fun to walk around the old Florida Cracker houses, church and other structures that have been moved to Silver Springs. This area has a lot of history: Ocala was established in 1846.

The Ocala woods were home to Florida Crackers, immortalized in the Majorie Kinnan Rawlings books, including her Pulitzer Prize winner, “The Yearling.” (Some scenes in the movie starring Gregory Peck were filmed at Silver Springs.)

That Cracker culture is preserved at the Silver River Museum and Environmental Education Center, which offers exhibits on Florida’s history and ecology. The museum is open to the public on weekends and holidays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $2; children under 6 are free. The museum is operated by the Marion County School District.

There are also exhibits about Silver Springs at the main park entrance.

Planning your trip to Silver Springs State Park

 Learn more about endangered Silver Springs and Silver River

Things to do near Ocala and Ocala National Forest

Updated March 2017

Tags: , , , , , , ,

3 Comments

  1. Bonnie L Tomlinson says:

    Thank you, I am an old Florida Cracker of 5 generations and am planning a trip here with my grown children and grandchildren.

  2. Thank you for posting this interesting and informative article! My family and I are planning to spend a couple nights at the park this week, and we are really looking forward to it. It’s exciting to know that we will be among the first to visit the park since its identity change. We look forward to the Cracker House museum, a cozy cabin, scenic trails, and tranquil waters.

  3. I could rock on the porch all day

Share your thoughts!

%d bloggers like this: