Historic / Northeast Florida

Five cool things we discovered in St. Augustine

Aviles Street paved with bricks.

The oldest street in St. Augustine is Aviles Street, and it is paved with bricks, not cobblestones. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

St. Augustine celebrated its 450th birthday in 2016, making it America’s oldest European city.

It’s one of Florida’s most popular destinations and thus many people probably think they know all about St. Augustine. I did too, before I made these cool discoveries on a recent visit.

 

Ponce de Leon was really short  

St. Augustine's waterfront is dominated by a status of Ponce de Leon,

St. Augustine’s waterfront is dominated by a status of Ponce de Leon, depicted life-size, which means very very short. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

When you visit St. Augustine, you can’t help but soak up the history of the Spanish explorers. It’s everywhere – from the magnificent fort, the Castillo de San Marco, which commands the waterfront, to the narrow lanes that make the historic district so charming.

It all started with Juan Ponce de Leon, the explorer who led the first European expedition to Florida in 1513 and named it. His statue stands at the head of the main street at the harbor, and it would be a commanding presence if it had been built at a monumental size.

The statue, however, is built life size, which means Ponce de Leon is this little guy on a big pedestal.

He was only 4 foot 11 inches tall! (The helmet makes him look a bit taller.)

 

It was founded by the Spanish, but the pioneers who are still around are the Minorcans

One sign of Minorcan culture is hot sauce made from datil peppers

St. Augustine made it to its 450th anniversary because early settlers from Minorca persevered. One sign of Minorcan culture is hot sauce made from datil peppers

St. Augustine heritage includes people from Minorca, who are known for their love of fiery datil peppers.

St. Augustine heritage includes people from Minorca, who are known for their love of fiery datil peppers. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

St. Augustine started as a Spanish colony, was handed to Britain in a treaty in 1763, was returned to the Spanish in 1783 and became part of a new U.S. territory in 1821.

In the meantime, a key group of settlers arrived  – folks from Minorca, an island in the Mediterranean off Spain.

If it weren’t for the Minorcans, historians say, St. Augustine probably wouldn’t be celebrating 450 years as the oldest continuously occupied European settlement in America.

And the Minorcans are still there.  Many old St. Augustine families trace their ancestry to several hundred Minorcans who came to Florida in 1768 as indentured servants to work on a New Smyrna indigo plantation. When this plantation failed, the surviving Minorcans  (hundreds died of dysentery and malaria) walked to St. Augustine and most never left.

Next time Florida changed hands (when Britain ceded it to Spain in 1783), it is the Minorcans who kept St. Augustine going.

Want to taste a little Minorcan heritage? Many restaurants serve Minorcan clam chowder and St. Augustine relishes the fiery datil pepper. (It’s as hot as a habanero.) While not from Minorca, the Minorcans adopted it centuries ago as their own and use it in a variety of recipes. You can taste chocolate covered datils at Hot Shot Bakery, 8 Granada St., St. Augustine,  (904) 824-7898

St. Augustine has a Datil Pepper festival annually (it’s Oct. 7, 2017) and many shops sell datil pepper products.


The historic streets are NOT cobblestone

St. Augustine bricks

St. Augustine takes good care of its old brick streets. When they get too uneven, the bricks are removed, cleaned and put back in place.

One of the most delightful things about St. Augustine is that so much of the historic old city is preserved. Narrow lanes and alleys are lined with century-old buildings, some dating to when the Spanish first settled.

To folks used to smooth pavement, the uneven street surfaces in the historic district are part of the charm.

But historian and author Karen Harvey, who leads private historic tours, warns:

“Don’t ever say we have cobblestone. We have bricks!”

When the old bricks get too uneven, the city carefully removes each brick, cleans it up and replaces the very same brick back in the road.

Cobblestones are rounded natural stones. Bricks are rectangular and manmade.

One of those brick streets, Avila Street, is the oldest street in the United States, Harvey says.


Florida sugar cane makes a darn good vodka

St. Augustine Distillery is located in a historic 190.7 former ice plant

St. Augustine Distillery is located in a historic 1907 former ice plant and offers free tours. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Free samples end the tour of St. Augustine Distillery, which makes hand-crafted rum, gin and vodka from local ingredients.

Free samples end the tour of St. Augustine Distillery, which makes hand-crafted rum, gin and vodka from local ingredients. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

Move over craft breweries because craft distilleries are here.

The St. Augustine Distillery is a prime example, and it’s attracting visitors who are loving the taste of hand-crafted rum, gin and vodka, made from local ingredients.

Located in a historic 1907 former ice plant, the distillery opened in 2014. It offers free tours and free samples at tour’s end.

Like the boom in local winemaking, the distillery emphasizes terroir – a sense of place. That’s why Head Distiller Brendan Wheatley says they buy sugar cane from “local not corporate farms,” including buying heirloom varieties of sugar cane from organic operations.

St. Augustine Distillery spirits are distributed only in Florida and Wheatley says, “We’re barely able to keep up with demand.” This year, the micro-distillery will produce about 500 barrels of booze, he said.

The St. Augustine Distillery is one of two dozen licensed craft distilleries in Florida.

The St. Augustine Distillery, 112 Riberia St., St. Augustine,  904-825-4963. Tours are given daily.


St. Augustine was key to the 1960s Civil Rights movement – and the town embraces that history

St. Augustine's Andrew Young Crossing marks a place where a hateful mob attacked a peaceful Civil rights march.

St. Augustine’s Andrew Young Crossing marks a place where a hateful mob attacked a peaceful Civil rights march. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

When I think of the Civil Right Movement, places like Birmingham and Selma come to mind. Until I visited, I didn’t realize St. Augustine belongs in that list.

Terrible things happened in St. Augustine.

Civil Rights leader Andrew Young led a peaceful march on June 9, 1964, and he was brutally bludgeoned by a white mob.

St. Augustine sign marks where Civil Rights leader Andrew Young led a peaceful march

St. Augustine sign marks where Civil Rights leader Andrew Young led a peaceful march on June 9, 1964 and was brutally bludgeoned by a white mob.

A week later, black and white protesters jumped into a whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge and the manager poured acid in the water to drive them away.

Martin Luther King was arrested on the steps of the Monson Motor Lodge and held in the St. Augustine jail.

Civil Rights leaders, however, say those often horrifying events directly led to the passage within weeks of the landmark Civil Rights Act in July 1964.

Today, to the surprise of some, you hear about these events from the cheerful guides on the ever-present tourist trolley tours. You also see monuments and markers at several sites.

There are bronze footprints in Constitution Plaza to mark where Andrew Young marched. The area was renamed Andrew Young Crossing, and inspiring quotes by Young are engraved in the sidewalk near a small monument. (This plaza has always been called the slave market; there’s a historic marker with details.)

Across the street, what is now a Wells Fargo bank branch has a mural marking the site of the Woolworth’s sit-in and the actual lunch counter is preserved inside, complete with the original menu.

The Monson Motel is long gone and a new Hilton is on the site. But the steps where Martin Luther King was arrested have been preserved and are marked with a brass plaque.

The St. Augustine’s Civil Rights story is important, says Dana Ste. Claire, director of heritage tourism for the city, because “it is the story of America.”

Andrew Young Crossing:  The intersection of King Street and St. George Street at the west end of Constitution Plaza.

Hilton Hotel and Martin Luther King steps:  32 Avenida Menendez, St. Augustine. The steps are located in the interior courtyard.

Woolworth’s lunch counter, now inside Wells Fargo Bank, 33 King St., St. Augustine, free and open to visitors.

Here’s a site rich with information about the Civil Rights movement in St. Augustine and the ACCORD Freedom Trail.

More resoources for exploring St. Augustine

The site where Menendez and the Spanish settlers landed is marked with a park. The landing will be re-created here on Sept. 8.

The site where Menendez and the Spanish settlers landed is marked with a park. The landing will be re-created here on Sept. 8. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

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7 Comments

  1. Geo Amonos says:

    I’m sure Ponce De Leon would be honored by your demeaning description of him.IE: Audie Murphy,Al Pacino, Sly Stallone,etc.
    Around here we judge a person by his or her accomplishments
    not their stature.
    The other sites were very good, thank you for sharing.

  2. Please know that the Solano and Sanchez families are Spanish families from the first Spanish period (1565 thru 1763)and they are still in St. Augustine. They are the first pioneers that are still around, in fact they are having a reunion on the sixth of September in St. Augustine to celebrate their heritage. They are families who stayed thru the English occupation (20 years). The Minorcans did not get to St. Augustine until the English occupation(1763 thru 1783). If you would like to learn more about the Los Floridanos, please email me. We Love to let folks know the rich history.

  3. So very sad to see DeNoel French Bakery has closed. It was a favorite of my friend Linda and I. So much charm.

  4. Robin Mueller says:

    A very good article, with lots of interesting and accurate information. My husband and I have been going to SA regularly for 13 years and just bought a house there. You should also mention the Lincolnville walking tours, which include stories of Dr. Hayling, a real Civil Rights pioneer. They’re led by Miss B and cover a lot of territory, including the St. Cyprian, the former Monson pool, which the new Hilton has preserved with a plaque and many Civil Rights sites. Lincolnville is ground zero for the Civil Rights movement in SA and an incredible place in itself. Thank you for the great article!

  5. Pingback: Five Cool Things I Discovered In St. Augustine On Its 450th Birthday | South Florida Reporter

  6. Thanks for the info! We travel from Orlando to St Augustine 2 or 3 times a year and are looking forward to touring the distillery.

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