Historic / Northeast Florida

Civil War buffs: Florida’s biggest battle, Olustee, re-enacted Feb. 14-16


The battle is expected to attract as many as 2,500 re-enactors from around the country.

The battle is expected to attract as many as 2,500 re-enactors from around the country.

Famous “Colored Regiments” among 10,000 troops who fought at Olustee

 From my home in Fort Lauderdale, I forget that I live in a state that was part of the Confederacy.  And then I visit a place like Olustee Battlefield State Historic Park, and Florida’s rich and fascinating history is revealed.

At Olustee, a state park near Lake City, that history comes alive next weekend when Florida’s largest Civil War battle, the Battle of Olustee, will be re-enacted, with gun smoke, booming cannons and cavalry.

Because 2014 will be the 150th anniversary of the battle, organizers expect this year’s event, Feb. 14-16, to be the largest Civil War re-enactment in the Southeast.

The original pitted 10,000 cavalry, infantry and artillery troops against each other in a five-hour battle in a pine forest near Olustee, 13 miles east of Lake City and 50 miles west of Jacksonville.

The Battle of Olustee re-enactment includes gun smoke, booming cannons and cavalry.

The Battle of Olustee re-enactment includes gun smoke, booming cannons and cavalry.

 Largest Civil War re-enactment in Southeast occurs near Jacksonville at Olustee Battlefield Historic Park Feb. 14-16.

Olustee is the largest Civil War re-enactment in  the Southeast.

Without a re-enactment, the battlefield a lovely, quiet place.

Without a re-enactment, the battlefield a lovely, quiet place.

Except for re-enactment weekend, the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park is a peaceful rural site through which the Florida National Scenic Trail passes.

Except for re-enactment weekend, the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park is a peaceful rural site through which the Florida National Scenic Trail passes.

The battle is expected to attract as many as 2,500 re-enactors from around the country and 25,000 viewers, according to Jeff Grzelak, a re-enactor from Orlando who has been at every Battle of Olustee, he says, “except the one in 1864.”

The weekend of living history activities includes exhibits, parades, period music concerts as well as restaging the battle for the 38th time.

Olustee isn’t a particularly famous battle; only Civil War buffs probably have heard of it.

But in addition to being the largest Civil War battle in Florida, Olustee has another interesting distinction:  three U.S. Colored Regiments (as they were then called) took part in the battle, including the now famous all-black volunteer unit, the 54th Massachusetts, the regiment immortalized in the 1989 movie, Glory. In fact, some of the movie scenes were filmed at the Olustee re-enactment. (Re-enactor Grzelak was in scenes from Glory as well as 30 other Civil War movies.)

The actual Battle of Olustee was bloody: One in four men was a casualty, with 2,807 killed, wounded or captured. It was a Confederate victory; Union forces retreated to Jacksonville.

In 1912, when many living Civil War veterans still attended reunions, the battlefield became Florida’s first state historic site and later one of Florida’s first state parks. In 1977, a few hundred re-enactors began the annual recreation of the battle.

It has grown over the years, and some people, like Grzelak, come back every year.

All Civil War re-enactments attract more Rebel soldiers than Union ones, Grzelak said. “Everybody wants to be the underdog,” he explained.  “There are more British in Revolutionary war re-enactments and more Nazis in WWII re-enactments.”

Grzelak, who grew up in Miami and now lives in Orlando, is a Union re-enactor; 25 years ago he formed his own unit, the Union’s 17th Connecticut. The real unit spent the end of the war guarding the St. Johns River in Florida.

African-American re-enactors are less common, but because of the three “colored” units in Olustee and the 150th anniversary, Grzelak said they expect 50 black re-enactors from around the country to participate.

The battle re-enactment, which includes a skirmish on Saturday and a scripted battle on Sunday, is dramatic and spectacular, according to Park Service Specialist Andrea Thomas. “There are cavalry runs with horses, pyrotechnics, big guns – it looks like a real battle.”

Her favorite activities, however, are the living history demonstrations on topics such as Civil War battlefield medical care and blacksmithing.

Re-enactors come from all over the country and visitors include people fascinated by the Civil War and those whose ancestors fought at the battle of Olustee, Thomas said. Last year, visitors came from New Zealand and Germany for the event.

Except for re-enactment weekend, the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park is a peaceful rural site through which the Florida National Scenic Trail passes.  You can stroll the quiet, pine-shaded battlefield trail, picnic and learn about the battle at the visitor center.

There are several monuments: The largest Confederate one was erected in 1912 before a crowd of 4,000 including many Confederate veterans. It’s an imposing tower that looks like part of a castle.

There are several monuments: The largest Confederate one was erected in 1912 before a crowd of 4,000 including many Confederate veterans. It’s an imposing tower that looks like part of a castle.

There are several monuments: The largest Confederate one was erected in 1912 before a crowd of 4,000 including many Confederate veterans. It’s an imposing tower that looks like part of a castle.

A memorial to the Union soldiers was erected at the site of a mass burial of federal soldiers in 1866. The original Union monument was made of wood that deteriorated, so a replica was recreated at the adjacent cemetery outside the park gates, thought to be its original location.

But Civil War monuments can still stir controversy around here. (As William Faulkner famously wrote: “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”)

So, recently, when the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War asked to place a more prominent Union memorial within the park boundaries, people objected, partly because the United Daughters of the Confederacy originally donated the park land to Florida.  A public hearing on the proposal was held in Lake City in early December; it drew 100 people and things got raucous, including a chorus of “Dixie.” A decision on the monument is in the hands of the Florida State Park system.

Meanwhile, folks in Lake City whose ancestors fought on both sides of the Civil War work together in a group called the Blue-Grey Army, whose purpose is to promote knowledge about Olustee’s history.

They are very careful not to re-fight the Civil War:

“Yes, we may play “Dixie” from time to time, that is because we are in the south and it represents the local heritage,” the Blue-Grey Army’s policy statement says. “Neither the Blue-Grey Army, nor the re-enactment, suggest ‘The South will rise again,’ but just a history lesson that the battle was fought by men on both sides who stood for important causes to them, many having made the ultimate sacrifice. Yes, the Confederates may have won the Battle of Olustee, but America won the war.”

Details about the re-enactment

What:  Living history weekend and Civil War-era battle reenactment

When:  Feb. 14- 16, 2014

Friday, Feb. 14

9 a.m. – While no battle is re-enacted, this is a good day for living history demonstrations. In addition to the re-enacting solders, Olustee attracts dozens of sutlers, merchants who traveled with the troops and who now sell wares to the re-enactors and the public. (All Olustee sutlers are inspected for authenticity.) While Friday is planned as an educational day for visiting school children, the general public is welcome. Events at the battlefield end with an 8 p.m. cannon firing by the artillery units.

Lake City: 9 to 6 p.m. Olustee Festival and Craft Show in Lake City with entertainment, arts, crafts, and food booths.

5 p.m. – Battle between the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimac) and a re-enactment skirmish at Lake Desoto, located in downtown Lake City.

Saturday, Feb. 15:

8 a.m. – noon Authentic campsites and sutlers village open.
10:30 a.m. – A Civil War-themed parade begins in Lake City. The Olustee Festival and Craft Show continues in Lakeland from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
Throughout the day: presentations, demonstrations, period music concert.
3:30 p.m. – Battle re-enactment

Sunday, Feb. 16:

9 a.m. — Campsites and sutler village open and presentations and demonstrations begin.
1:30 p.m. — 38th Annual Reenactment of 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Olustee, a scripted re-enactment
2:45 p.m.  – Formal retreat for final volley
3 – 5 p.m. -- Re-enactors and sutlers break camp

Where:  Olustee Battlefield is located on U.S. 90, 13 miles east of Lake City and 50 miles west of Jacksonville. 5815 Battlefield Trail Road, Olustee, FL  32072

Admission: Adults $10; school-age children $5; pre-school children free. Admission for Friday school day is $3. (In Lake City, some merchants will have flyers with a $3 off coupon.)

Parking: No public parking is available at the state park during the re-enactment weekend. Parking with shuttle service is available at the Lake City Airport on the east side of Lake City to the west of Olustee, or at the Baker County Correctional Facility (CCF) one mile east of Olustee. Both sites are on Route 90.  Shuttle services is $2 for adults and $1 for children under 12. Once visitors arrive at the battlefield park, handicapped visitors can be shuttled to the authentic campsite and sutler village and the re-enactment battle site.

Places to Stay near Olustee

Hotels in Lake City (13 miles)

Hotels near Sanderson (10 miles)

Places to Camp near Olustee

There is no camping available at Olustee Battlefield State Park. Here are other nearby campgrounds:

Stephen Foster Cultural Center State Park (22 miles)

O’Leno State Park (22 miles)

Starke/Gainesville KOA (26 miles)

 

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