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The Chaz: Springs & wildlife make this river a special kayak trail

Last updated on July 28th, 2021 at 10:57 am

We would have loved kayaking the Chassahowitzka River, better known as the Chaz, if only one of these things were true:

  • Within the first 10 minutes, we paddled over magical springs that sparkled like swimming pools (and, indeed, you can swim there.)
  • On one of the Chaz’s tributaries, we spent 15 minutes watching a family of five or six otters scampering, swimming, fishing, diving and delighting us.
  • We paddled up a tributary where the water got clearer and shallower until we finally waded the last little stretch to the beautiful spring called “The Crack.” And we had this mysterious lagoon and swimming hole all to ourselves.

We didn’t care that we didn’t spot the manatees that frequent the Chassahowitzka or the bald eagles we were told to watch for. Let’s not be greedy: It is a splendid kayaking river for the scenery alone.

At the very start of the Chassahowitzka, you find one of the prettiest spots, the Seven Sisters Spring.
At the very start of the Chassahowitzka, you find one of the prettiest spots, the Seven Sisters Spring. (Photo by Bonnie Gross)

The Chaz is located a half hour south of the better known Crystal River.  It’s about 100 miles west of Orlando in a rural, less-developed area of Florida that calls itself the Nature Coast. The Seminoles named it “pumpkin hanging place” after a type of climbing pumpkin that may be extinct, according to the Florida Wildlife Commission.

At the river’s origin, there’s a tiny community with a handful of houses and trailers. Within a few miles of paddling downstream, you enter the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, a vast tangle of saltwater marshes and wild islands.

Whereas it was once a sleepy off-the-beaten-path destination, it has now become a popular boating destination, so weekends can get crowded.

Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge pops into the news because it is the winter home of the whooping cranes that were re-introduced to the area by following an ultra-light from Wisconsin. (You are not likely to spot the cranes; their home is a remote island whose location is kept secret.)

Launching on the Chassahowitzka

The Chaz is an easy river to kayak. You can put in your own kayak at a sandy launch site at the Chassahowitzka River Campground, where you also can rent kayaks and canoe at reasonable rates.

Ask for a map at the marina at the Chassahowitzka River Campground. (It used to be online too, but that link is now broken. As an alternative, here’s a map from US Fish and Wildlife Service.)

"The Crack," a spring that is the origin of Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chaz.
“The Crack,” a spring that is the origin of Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chassahowitzka River. (Photo: Bonnie Gross)

The water is so clear you see schools of fish as you paddle. As soon as we launched we started seeing herons, pelicans and osprey. (Eventually we saw hawks, kingfishers, cormorants, anhingas and a pair of wood ducks, too.)

Immediately to the right of the marina and within a five-minute paddle you come to the Seven Sister Spring. Many people miss this beautiful series of springs because they start paddling downriver.

As you’ll see on the map, there are several tributaries, some with springs, which are worth exploring. The first, Crab Creek Spring, leads to a lush lagoon with a spring and a single large home.

If you paddle Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chaz, you must walk the last section to reach "The Crack."
If you paddle Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chaz, you must walk the last section to reach “The Crack.” (Photo by David Blasco)

The “must do” tributary is Baird Creek, a narrow shaded winding stream that is considerably longer. It’s a beautiful paddle; be sure to go to the end. First you reach the Blue Spring, a wide area where the water turns turquoise. Then, continue as the creek narrows all the way to the Crack, a spring that emanates from a deep rocky crevice in the pond. When we paddled, the river was shallow at the end so we continued the last few hundred feet barefoot in ankle-deep water walking on white sand. What fun!

At the end, the Crack is a perfect and popular swimming hole with a rope swing, and on this Sunday afternoon, we were the only ones there.

Peering into the deep blue of "The Crack," a spring that is the origin of Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chassahowitzca.
Peering into the deep blue of “The Crack,” a spring that is the origin of Baird Creek, a tributary of the Chassahowitzca. (Photo David Blasco)

Paddling up Baird Creek takes about an hour, depending on how long you linger in this lovely spot.

We kayaked up the next tributary, Salt Creek, but it was less scenic. (Lots of dead trees and some sort of aquatic plant that covered the shore and rocks like a mat.) This was the place, however, where we happened on the otter family that will remain an enduring memory of this trip.

As you paddle downstream, the river widens and you pass fishing shacks, mansions, sunken boats and plenty of birds.

We loved wading up Baird Creek when it got too shallow to paddle. It didn't take long to reach "The Crack."
We loved wading up Baird Creek when it got too shallow to paddle. It didn’t take long to reach “The Crack” from the Chaz. (Photo: David Blasco)

In about 2.5 miles (not counting all the tributaries to explore), you come to a sign marking the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge and from there on, the rest is open and unshaded. We turned around here, but if you skipped the side-trips (and I wouldn’t), you could continue paddling for miles. In another three or four miles, you reach the Gulf and, just before it, Dog Island, a recreation area with a restroom and dock.

An otter swimming at the Chassahowitzka River. He was with a family of five or six otters we encountered.
An otter swimming at the Chassahowitzka River. He was with a family of five or six otters we encountered. (Photo Bonnie Gross)

Planning your kayak trip on the Chassahowitzka

  • Put in at the Chassahowitzka River Campground, 8600 W Miss Maggie Drive, Chassahowitzka. Launching is free but there is a charge for parking.
  • Camping here is $55 a night for RVs with full hookups; $26 per night for tents.
  • We stayed two blocks away at the Chassohowitzka Hotel, a historic building from the turn of the century now operated as a B&B by the fourth generation of the original family. Rates are from $99 (shared bath) to $135 (private bath) per night. It’s a lovely spot that caters more to groups than individuals. (You can rent the whole place for $825 per night and it sleeps 18.)
  • Dining: There are several choices 20 minutes away in Homosassa, including the locals dive bar, the waterfront Freezer Tiki Bar, which steams delicious peel-and-eat fresh shrimp and serves cheap beer. The menu is limited, but the smoked mullet fish dip is worth the visit alone.

Things to do near Chassahowitzka River

A primitive campsite along the Chassahowitzka was clean and litter-free, perhaps because of the sign.
A primitive campsite along the Chaz was clean and litter-free, perhaps because of the sign. It you go, please do your part to keep this area clean and wild. (Photo: David Blasco)

A note from the editor:

The information in this article was accurate when published but can change without notice. Please confirm details when planning your trip by following the links in this article.

This article is the property of FloridaRambler.com and is protected by U.S. Copyright Law. Re-publication without written permission is against the law.


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Rick

Tuesday 27th of July 2021

It is now over crowded, parking has to be closed on the weekends and boats run on plane in the narrow channel so stay out of the middle.

Pamela

Monday 19th of July 2021

Is this a good/safe place to paddle board?

Bonnie Gross

Friday 23rd of July 2021

Yes. I think it would be a good places for SUPS, particularly in the portion of the river closest to the springs.

Jess

Monday 19th of July 2021

Unable to pull up the map, the link may be broken.

Bonnie Gross

Friday 23rd of July 2021

Darn. Thanks for the update. When we paddled here, the marina gave us a copy of this useful map, which used to also be online at that link. I've added an alternate map from US Fish & Wildlife as a resource.)

Aaron

Friday 11th of June 2021

A couple problems with your map.

You said you put in at Chassahowitzka River Campground but it isn't on the map.

Also it say's "You are here", where is here? Is that the Chassahowitzka River Campground?

Aaron

Saturday 14th of August 2021

@Bonnie Gross, Thank you!

Bonnie Gross

Friday 11th of June 2021

Aaron: You're right. It's not clear. On the map, "You are here" is the location of the Chassahowitzka River Campground. I've added a note to that effect to the post.

Yesi S

Friday 4th of December 2020

Hi! Thank you so much for this post and information!! My husband and I followed the details: we took our own kayak, parked at the campground launch ($5) and went down stream 1st to Baird Creek to the end and loved the paddle through that channel. The windey narrowing trail was great. We saw tons of birds and fish. The spring at the end was too clear to but still saw a TON of fish from the surface. We then went to Snapper Hole where large amounts of manatees surprised us there. Even came up to our kayak. Then headed back upstream the the 7 sisters spring holes. It was great and all thanks to your instructions and willingness to share your adventure with us. Thank you!

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